The Need for a True Black Patriarchy

Portrait of Liberian President William Tubman working at his desk in Monrovia in 1956. Born 29 November 1895 in Harper, Liberia, Tubman grew up in poverty and under severe discipline. Tubman first planned to be a preacher and was accredited, at 19, as a Methodist lay pastor. He studied law and at 23 successfully passed the bar exam. He later won the election to the local legislature and occupied a wide range of public offices. At 35 he won election to the Liberian Senate. In 1943 he unexpectedly announced his candidacy for the presidency. Tubman won handily in the ensuing election and six times thereafter. Tubman died in London on July 23, 1971, shortly after his election to a seventh term as president. He was immediately succeeded by Vice president William R. Tolbert. (FILM)

A mentor of mine told me a story once.  He was a man who has traveled all over the world.  One time he was in an Asian country walking around with a friend in a small town taking in the culture.   While walking he saw an older Asian man sitting on a porch just looking out.   He acknowledged the older man and kept walking.   When my mentor and his friend stopped at a stand to look at some fruit they were approached by four young men who started to harass them.   At that point the older man stood up and said something to the young men.   The young men stopped their harassment and walked away with their heads hung in shame.   My mentor and his friend bowed to the older man and the older man bowed in return.   It turns out the older man was the patriarch of the community and he wasn’t just sitting around relaxing.   The older man was maintaining order in his community.   This is something we need in the Black community.

The majority of Black communities in America are in disarray.   There is no real sense of order.   Even the communities that are seemingly functional seem to lack something.   What has happened is that the male principle has been demonized in the Black community.  When I say the male principle I mean primal masculine drive to create boundaries and order.   We live in a de facto matriarchy.   The nature of female energy is chaos.   The energy does not create boundaries and order.   This is not to say that feminine energy is evil but it must be balanced by male energy.   In that way functional communities are created.

Over the past several decades the spirit of man has been demonized.   There is no place for real masculine energy in society.  We still see it on the football field.  We see it on TV and in action movies.  Men can sit on the couch and watch over men be men.  Maybe even dream that they are those men.   Then the man has to wake up and go to a job that is killing his spirit or worse deal with an emasculating woman sleeping in the bed next to him.   Many women see this as some sort of victory.   They are sadly mistaken.

With the removal of the patriarchal principle from society these same women who feel like they have such great freedom cannot walk down the street safely.   Many of these same women who feel like they have achieved something are afraid of their own sons in many cases.   Then they expect the very same men that they have emasculated to protect them.   Am I the only one who sees how psychotic this is?

Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.   There are many women and their simp supporters who feel like things will be right if more women would become “goddesses” or “queens.”   If something hasn’t worked for decades it’s not going to start working all of a sudden.  Indeed maybe centuries as some commentators have argued that this matriarchy existed during slavery.   Whatever the case it’s time for a Black Patriarchy to assert itself.  What does this mean for the community?   Let’s count the ways.

First and foremost it means order.   As mentioned earlier the nature of men is to create boundaries and order.   Much of the chaos is perpetrated by out of control young men.   Some of these young men seek order by forming themselves into gangs which is really a shared masculine boundary.   In indigenous cultures the older men would take the young ones through a rites of passage.   Once the young men passed their rites they would be accepted into the circle or boundary of the older men.    This would foster order.   Applied to present times instead of young men being a threat to their communities they would be its protectors.   Women and elders would not be afraid to walk down the street.

A Black Patriarchy would be able to deal with the Patriarchies of other groups.   If one were to examine any powerful racial or ethnic group in the world these groups are led by men.  I challenge any person to show me a powerful matriarchy on the planet.   The reason the Black community is in the position it’s in is because Black women regardless of the money and education cannot compete with the men of other cultures.   Only men can do this.  Men are the ones built for physical, political, and economic warfare.   It’s our nature.

A Black Patriarchy must assert itself as power can only be taken and not given.   Until that happens for a critical mass of the Black community the conversations and complaints we have will only be repeated by future generations.   The time is now to take action.

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  • Thomas

    Great article. Looking forward to viewing more.